Open Letter to the Emergency Operations Centre

I wrote this email on March 23, 2021 to the Emergency Operations Centre of the Ministry of Health in regards to Directive #3 which places significant restrictions on the residents of Long Term Care homes during the pandemic. The email has gone unanswered and so I making it public today.

Hi there,

I’m currently the medical director for Bay Haven Long Term Care in Collingwood Ontario.  I had sent the email below asking for some easing of restrictions for our LTC as we now have all but two residents (new admits) who were fully immunized for COVID-19.  Our medical officer of health, Dr. Colin Lee expressed that while he was sympathetic, he could not overturn Directive #3, and asked that forward you with my original email.  I would ask that you please consider the overall well being of the residents in LTC centres like mine, where we have almost full immunization.


Begin original letter:


Hi Xxxx, 

I understand you are the contact person at Public Health for Bay Haven.  I’m hoping that you can help me advocate for the residents of the nursing home.  As you are aware, most nursing home residents throughout the province are suffering from “confinement syndrome”.  The year long isolation caused by the COVID pandemic has had a devastating effect on their emotional health and the residents are really struggling as a result.  

As the Medical Director, I see these issues when I visit, and it pains me to see how much the mood of the residents has gone down in the past year.  Don’t get me wrong, I do understand the rational behind some of the restrictions that have been put in place, and I have supported those restrictions.  They were important to protect the health and safety of Bay Haven, and we have been fortunate to not have a COVID outbreak in our facility. 

But we also now are in a situation where all but two of the residents (new admits) are immunized for COVID and a good number of staff are immunized as well.  With that, I need to focus on the other aspects of care for the residents.  

The blunt reality however, is that Bay Haven will not go against Public Health directives, no matter what I personally think of them.  So I need your (or somebody in public health’s) support to change some of the directives. 

I want to point out that the most recent data shows that the COVID vaccines DO, in fact, reduce transmission (https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/pfizer-covid-vaccine-cuts-transmission-coronavirus-new-real-world-study-n1260542).  This is unsurprising as every other successful vaccine also reduces transmission, but we now have proof of this.  In fact, transmission of COVID is reduced after just ONE dose of the vaccine (https://www.huffpost.com/entry/pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-reduces-transmission-after-1-dose-study-finds_n_6038e92ec5b6b745c4b655ba). 

With that, I would like to implement the following changes (and need Public Health to support): 

1) We continue to have less than 100% of our staff immunized.  To encourage more of them to be immunized, I would like to stop screening with np swabs, those that have been immunized (two weeks after their second shot).  Nobody likes getting an NP swab.  If the un-immunized staff see that they will not be subjected to this test, it might encourage them to get their own shots.  And we get to save our swabs for those who really need it.  (Addendum – Since this letter is public, what I was not aware of when I wrote the original is that Bay Haven actually has one of the highest percentages of nursing home staff who’ve been immunized in the province – almost 80%! Having said that, nothing wrong with going for the other 20%)

2) All the residents who have been immunized need to be allowed to go back to congregating as usual.  This includes all their group activities and sessions. 

3) We should allow an increased number of visitors to the facility.  I would agree the visitors should have proof of either immunization, a recent negative COVID swab, or be willing to have a rapid swab done in our facility.  I think each resident can assign 4 people who can come and visit, and we can work on putting a limit on the number of visitors at any one time.  

4) If a resident has been immunized, they should be able to leave the facility for social gatherings, not just medical appointments.  Whoever drives them would need to have proof of immunization, a recent swab or have an NP swab in our facility since they presumably enter the building.  But the immunized resident cannot (as per the articles above) bring back and transmit the infection themselves. 

If Public Health could support this, it would go a long way to improving the mental health of the residents and improve their quality of life.  It’s the least we can do after all they have done for society over their years.   

Sohail Gandhi, MD, CCFP

Medical Director, Bay Haven Seniors

Letter to the Staff of My Nursing Home

Note: The following is a letter I sent to all the staff of Bay Haven Seniors, a joint Retirement and Nursing Home. There has been rather a lot of variable information about the new Covid vaccines out there, and I wanted to address that up front. Some of this information may help you as well, so I’m copying it here.

To:  All Staff at Bay HavenFrom: Dr. M. S. Gandhi, Medical Director
Re: New Vaccines for COVID19


As I think all of you are now aware, Bay Haven has been fortunate to have our staff given the opportunity to immunize early with the new vaccines for COVID19.  There has been much written about the vaccines in print and on Social Media (unfortunately!!) .  I wanted to let you know about some information on the development of the vaccine, and why I do strongly encourage people to get the vaccine.


In “normal” times (remember those?), when a drug company thinks about whether it’s a good idea to develop a vaccine for a certain disease, there is a bit of convoluted process that has to happen first.  Some officious bureaucrat at the drug company does a cost analysis on how much it will cost to make the vaccine and how much profit could be made from it.  Then it goes to a regulatory body in the host country where some other pointy headed bureaucrat looks at how widespread the disease is and whether it’s worth while to approve a trial.  Then it goes back to the company where some lawyer reviews the cost/benefit ratio, whence it goes back to the officious bureaucrat and then back to the pointy headed one.  Amazingly enough (and I’m not kidding here) this process can take 2,3, even 5 years before a trial even begins.


This time, every body agreed right off the bat that it was good idea to have a vaccine for COVID19, and so the up to five years of paperwork was eliminated. Seriously, that bureaucratic bafflegab can take that long.


The next step after the paper work is done is for a vaccine to undergo three phases of trials.  It’s important to know that both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines DID undergo all three phases of trials.  Given the catastrophic situation around COVID, the trials were done quickly, but they were fully completed.  The Pfizer trials had about 42,000 people (by the way about 35% were people of colour ).  The Moderna vaccine had over 30,000 people (also with 35% people of colour).  The trials were extremely successful (94-95% effectiveness).  

The main side effects are the same as you would get from just about every other vaccine (pain at the injection site, fatigue, muscle pain, joint pain, fever).  These side effects are rare and and if they occur, go away in a couple of days.


There has also been a lot of talk about the fact that these are the first vaccines to be developed using “mRNA” technology.  I appreciate that when people talk about genetics, it can cause many people to have second thoughts.  But, mRNA technology has been studied for something like 30 years now in the oncology field.  Additionally, mRNA cannot and will not affect your genes.  It’s your genes that make mRNA in your body.  Your mRNA can’t go backwards and affect your genes.  


In short mRNA vaccines are an efficient, safe process.  They actually herald a new era of vaccine development that promises rapid and effective prevention for new pandemics in the future.  This is a good thing.


I also want to address some concerns about side effects circulating on social media.  The first is with respect to Bell’s Palsy.  There were four people in the Pfizer trials who developed Bell’s Palsy (now recovered) after getting a dose of the vaccine.  This translates to a side effect rate of .01%.  However, the “background rate” for Bell’s Palsy is .03%.  Put another way, if we were to simply pick 40,000 people at random, and watch them for a year, we would expect 12 people to get Bell’s Palsy.  This is why health professionals don’t feel that Bell’s Palsy is related to the vaccines.


Second, there is some talk about anaphylactic reactions (which can happen with any vaccines).  With the Pfizer vaccine the concern is polyethylene glycol.  Moderna has this in their vaccine too, but it seems in a different manner.  There may be some concern about this for patients who have severe allergies (to the point that you carry an epi-pen).  The best recommendation I could give is that if, and only if, you allergies are so bad that you need an epi-pen, it would be reasonable to wait for the Moderna vaccine (which just got approved today).  We expect this vaccine to be available for distribution in February.  If you do not need an epi-pen, then you should get the Pfizer one as it is out already.


If you want additional material, there is a nice thread from one of Ontario’s leading infectious disease specialists here:
https://threader.app/thread/1338610832884854784


There’s also a great interview with one of Ontario’s leading allergists/immunologists here:
https://twitter.com/jkwan_md/status/1339344606555746305


Finally, I would like to thank all of you for all the hard work you have done this year.  2020 is a year that we will never forget, and I suspect a year that we are all anxious to give the boot too.  Yet despite the hardship, the challenges and the seemingly unending (bad) surprises, you have continued to keep the residents safe, clean and comfortable.  Providing this at the latter stages of peoples lives is the absolute minimum sign of respect we can show, and the staff have done that in spades this year.


Thank you again, and allow me to wish all of you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!


Dr. M. S. Gandhi

Medical Director, Bay Haven

A Physician Speaks Out About Long Term Care and COVID19

Dr. Silvy Mathew

The following blog was written by Dr. Silvy Mathew, who is by far one of the smartest people I know, and a dedicated and compassionate family physician to boot. It originally appeared as a Twitter Thread after she chipped in to lend a hand at a Long Term Care facility in crisis. It is being reproduced here with permission.

Tonight is 3rd night of no sleep since I went into a Long Term Care home (nursing home) in Ontario with over a hundred COVID19 positive residents, and almost no staff. So far, my other nursing homes have avoided outbreaks, but what I witnessed yesterday is needing words I don’t have. My brain can’t rest, and I think I’m in shock.

I’m not even tearful. I’m not afraid for myself (although yes the conditions were not good and Christmas with elderly parents is cancelled for sure now). I am just … hyper-vigilant.

I woke up after a couple hrs of sleep, having “dreamt” of another catastrophe. What I think my brain is ruminating on is how many levels have gone wrong here. This isn’t an individual’s fault, this is just so damn systemic. And with the right resources and people in charge, given some power to leverage things, we could probably stop some deaths.

But the system doesn’t allow for that. And asking individuals to do more…and more…and more… While we are all trying to maintain their other responsibilities… This is why things are crashing and burning now. It is traumatizing to say the least.

The worst is that only those of us who share these experiences and work in the same environment, can empathize. Empathy is lacking as a whole in our society, but even among colleagues because it feels (and is) like a war environment. And that itself is shocking nine months in.

At this point, it’s too late to stop events or focus on who’s responsible. Mitigation is key, but requires leadership, ground knowledge, and support.

I can say that the “boots on the ground” were women. All colours, various ages. And yes, a few men. Physicians, nurses, PSWs. Those whose pay is less were more likely to be BIPOC and female. The ones without sleep or breaks? Female.

I wish I took the contact of the RPN I worked with. She was one day new and a superstar. A hero. Maybe I’ll cry at some point but right now, I wish I could sleep.